Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Canada’s hypocrisy: George W. Bush permitted, George Galloway banned

by Lech Biegalski |

Global Research, March 21, 2009

March to War

Those who stand for nothing will fall for anything


On March 17, 2009, George W. Bush was allowed to enter Canada and give a speech to the business community in Calgary. His arrival was accepted by the Canadian government which completely ignored the
Letter to the RCMP issued by the Lawyers Against the War organization.

On March 21, 2009, the BBC reported, “George Galloway, a British member of Parliament, has been banned from Canada on security grounds. /…/ British media reported the decision was due to his views on Afghanistan and the presence of Canadian troops there.”

Shortly after George Galloway was denied entry to Canada to speak at an anti-war event in Toronto, The Canadian Press reported that several organizations expressed their appreciation of the government’s decision:

“The Canadian Jewish Congress quickly issued a statement commending the government for its decision.

“We applaud the Canadian government for keeping George Galloway, a man who thrives on his support of terrorists, out of Canada,” said CJC Co-President Sylvain Abitbol.

“George Galloway publicly brags about his moral and, in some cases financial, support for internationally recognized terrorist organizations including Hamas, Hezbollah and the Taliban. He proudly flaunts his own nation’s laws and dares Western states to prosecute him for his support of terrorists. He is clearly a risk to Canadians,” he added.

“B’nai Brith Canada also endorsed the government’s action.”

Bernie Farber, the CEO of the Canadian Jewish Congress, was available for an interview on the Sympatico MSN Network. Farber described Galloway as a supporter of “terrorism.” By quoting Galloway’s statements out of political context and by presenting Hamas and Hezbollah as “terrorist organizations” out of historical context, Farber has shown a very limited ability to indoctrinate his audience. Using President Obama’s words, “The only place that might work is at Hollywood.”

According to The Canadian Press, the organizers of the event expressed an opposite opinion:

“This is a full frontal attack on free speech in Canada, and one that all supporters of civil liberties must challenge,” said James Clark from the Toronto Coalition to Stop the War.

“Kenney’s ban is an unprecedented move to censor someone whose views are critical of our own government’s foreign policy. We will not accept this ban, and we plan on challenging it.”

The political reaction was divided:

In Winnipeg, Liberal Leader Michael Ignatieff said he didn’t agree with Galloway’s views.

“We let into Canada all kinds of people who say ridiculous and absurd things and Galloway has said his share of ridiculous and absurd things. The issue … is whether the security services know something about George Galloway that I don’t,” he said.

“The minister of immigration is becoming the minister of censorship,” NDP immigration critic Olivia Chow said. “We don’t have to agree with everything Mr. Galloway talks about.

“But, at bare minimum, they should be allowed to express their points of view so Canadians can make decisions themselves. This is pure censorship and it’s wrong.”

George Galloway has been an outspoken peace activist, an opponent of the war in Iraq, the occupation of Afghanistan, the occupation of Palestine, and the Israeli massacres in Lebanon and Gaza.

For the record, here is what George Galloway really stands for:

Continued >>

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